Women 

In 2015, it is estimated that among U.S. women there will be: 

231,840 new cases of invasive breast cancer (This includes new cases of primary breast cancer among survivors, but 

not recurrence of original breast cancer among survivors.) 
60,290 new cases of in situ breast cancer (This includes ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and lobular carcinoma in situ 

(LCIS). Of those, about 83 percent will be DCIS. DCIS is a noninvasive breast cancer and LCIS is a condition that

increases the risk of invasive breast cancer. 
40,290 breast cancer deaths


Men

Breast cancer in men is rare, but it does happen. In 2015, it is estimated that among men in the U.S. there will be: 

2,350 new cases of (This includes new cases of primary breast cancer among survivors, but not recurrence of original 

breast cancer among survivors.) 
440 breast cancer deaths 

Rates of breast cancer incidence (new cases) and mortality (death) are much lower among men than among women. For example, in 2012 (most recent data available) 

Survival rates for men are about the same as for women with the same stage of cancer at the time of diagnosis. However, men are often diagnosed at a later stage. Men may be less likely than women to report symptoms, which may lead to 

delays in diagnosis. Learn more about the warning signs of breast cancer in men. 

Treatment for men is the same as treatment for women and usually includes some combination of surgery, radiation 

therapy, chemotherapy, hormone therapy and/or targeted therapy.

 

Breast cancer is the most common cancer among African-American women. It is also the second leading cause of cancer death among African-American women (lung 

cancer is the major cause of cancer death among these women). In 2013 (most recent data available), an estimated 

27,060 new cases of breast cancer and 6,080 deaths were expected to occur among African-American women. 

Overall, breast cancer incidence is about the same for African-American and white women. 

However, for women younger than 45, incidence is higher among African-American women than white women. 

In 2012 (most recent data available), breast cancer mortality (death) was 42 percent higher in African-American women than in white women. Although breast cancer survival in African-American 

women has increased over time, survival rates remain lower than among white women. For those diagnosed from 2005 

to 2011, the five-year relative survival rate for breast cancer among African

American women was 80 percent compared to 89 percent among white women. There are many possible reasons for this difference in survival including: 

Biologic and genetic differences in tumors 
Prevalence of risk factors 
Barriers to health care access 
Health behaviors 
Later stage of breast cancer at diagnosis




Resource information provided by Susan G. Komen